Smithsonian Candidate #6…Kinderjik

I am thinking of entering the Smithsonian Photo Contest even though I have zero chance of winning. I say that not to denigrate my ability as a photographer, but each category already has over 50,000 entries. Sure a lot of them are crap but some, well follow the link above and see for yourself. Also you can only submit work from 1/1/2016 until the present and all works with people must have a model release.

If you are familiar with any of my work (e.g. Moment and Souls) you probably realize I don’t have a lot of model releases.

Fortunately I do have some images that may qualify in other categories and will be publishing some here to see if you feel they quality. Please comment and let me know your thoughts.This one is in the Travel Category and is a view of a windmill of Kinderjik, Holland.

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

Kinderjik

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Inside The Windmill

Last time we visited Holland we took a tour of the UNESCO site at Kinderjik. The Windmills of Kinderdijk are along the Rhine River in Holland south of Amsterdam. They are used to manage water and eliminate flooding and have been in existence since the 15th Century.

Inside the Windmill there is a living area for the Windmill Tender. This is a view of a small kitchen right next to the the main shaft of the windmill.I imagine the petroleum is used for the mill but maybe it is power for a kitchen stove. Behind the kitchen you can watch the gears turning while you cook.

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

Inside The Windmill

Inside The Windmill

Another View of Kinderjik

Last year I posted about the famous windmills at Kinderjik in Holland. This is another view of the world famous UNESCO site.

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Another View of Kinderjik

National Geographic at Kinderjik

Last time we visited Holland we took a tour of the UNESCO site at Kinderjik. The Windmills of Kinderdijk are along the Rhine River in Holland south of Amsterdam. They are used to manage water and eliminate flooding and have been in existence since the 15th Century.

Our guide told us that this yellow wooden frame was to mark the spot where a National Geographic Cover was photographed. I don’t think that the yellow frame was placed by the Magazine but rather the tourist authority that manages the site.

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

National Geographic at Kinderjik

Gears Inside the Windmill

Last time we visited Holland we took a tour of the UNESCO site at Kinderjik. The Windmills of Kinderdijk are along the Rhine River in Holland south of Amsterdam. They are used to manage water and eliminate flooding and have been in existence since the 15th Century.

This is a view of the inside of one of the mills that is not currently operating and functions currently as a museum. These are the huge gears that are used to keep the mill turning.

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

Gears Inside the Windmill

Gears Inside the Windmill

Dutch Clouds

The first two times I went to the Nederlands (Holland) I visited only Amsterdam. We did rent a car and visited Castle country but it was a gray rain filled day. Even the day we went to the Keukenhof Gardens was stormy. On this trip we started in Amsterdam but then took a river cruise and the second day we woke up in Kinderdijk Nederlands and finally learned the meaning behind the expression Dutch Clouds

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

Dutch Clouds

Dutch Clouds

Windmills of Kinderdijk Nederlands (UNESCO Site)

The Windmills of Kinderdijk are along the Rhine River in Holland south of Amsterdam. They are used to manage water and eliminate flooding and have been in existence since the 15th Century. The name of the town means “children’s dike” and refers to a folk tale that after the a great flood when they went to access the damage they saw a cat in a child’s cradle jumping to maintain the balance of the cradle. As the cradle drifted to shore they found a baby inside the cradle. This is the source of the folk tale, “The Cat and The Cradle”.

Although some of the windmills are still used, the main water works are provided by two diesel pumping stations near one of the entrances of the windmills site.

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

Kinderdijk

Kinderdijk