Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

Tucked behind the Cathedral of Notre Dame is a little visited memorial, Most people stumble upon it looking for a walk down to the river. The Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation is a memorial to the 200,000 people who were deported from Vichy France to the Nazi concentration camps during World War II.

It was designed by French architect and town planner Georges-Henri Pingusson and dedicated by Charles de Gaulle on April 12, 1962. The memorial is shaped like a ship’s prow and the “crypt” is accessible by two staircases. Inside is the tomb of an unknown deportee who was killed at the camp in Neustadt. Along both walls of the narrow chamber are 200,000 glass crystals with light shining through, meant to symbolize each of the deportees who died in the concentration camps. Worthy of a visit next time in Paris.

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Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

The back view of Notre Dame de Paris offers a splendid view of the famous flying buttresses that support the cathedral. Almost hidden behind the park benches and hedges is a walkway to the end of Île de la Cité. Here you will find the Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation.

This simple monument is not so much a Holocaust memorial but specifically a memorial to the more than 200,000 people who were deported from Vichy France to the Nazi concentration camps during World War II. Designed by French architect Georges-Henri Pingusson (1894–1978), the memorial was inaugurated by Charles de Gaulle on April 12, 1962.It is a simple design and takes just a few minutes to visit yet most people have no idea what it is or why it is there.

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Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation