Kristallnacht

Americans have some dates burned in their memory. September 11 and December 7 are two notorious dates where Americans were attacked, killed and suffered extreme hardships. It is important as Americans to remember these dates and honor the fallen. However, as citizens of the world we MUST remember today as well because it is the 76th anniversary of Kristallnacht.

Tonight were the first attacks on Jewish homes in Germany. At least 91 Jews were killed in the attacks, and a further 30,000 arrested and incarcerated in concentration camps. Jewish homes, hospitals, and schools were ransacked, over 1,000 synagogues were burned and Jewish businesses destroyed or damaged. Millions of others experienced death and torture by the lunatic Hitler. We must never forget and always honor this day. Things are much better in Europe now for Jewish people that have remained or returned over all these years. However, recently when visiting Italy I saw it was still necessary for soldiers to guard the synagogue in Milan and heavy fences kept out even curious tourists like myself.

Please visit my gallery to see other, more uplifting images of Europe. Click here.

Synagogue in Milan Italy

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Stolen Art at Museum Judenplatz Wien

The Jewish Museum of Vienna is a fascinating and well curated collection. The displays are thoughtful and well presented. Although some sections brought tears to my eyes. Some I viewed with amazement. One area did both.

This is a picture of one part of the 4th floor archive archive. It is filled with all the valuable Torah decorations that the Nazis stole form the European Jews. They burned all the scrolls but kept all the decorations made of gold and silver.

It bears repeating that this picture is only one section. The whole third floor of the museum is filled with other glass cases just like this.

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

Stolen Art

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

The back view of Notre Dame de Paris offers a splendid view of the famous flying buttresses that support the cathedral. Almost hidden behind the park benches and hedges is a walkway to the end of Île de la Cité. Here you will find the Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation.

This simple monument is not so much a Holocaust memorial but specifically a memorial to the more than 200,000 people who were deported from Vichy France to the Nazi concentration camps during World War II. Designed by French architect Georges-Henri Pingusson (1894–1978), the memorial was inaugurated by Charles de Gaulle on April 12, 1962.It is a simple design and takes just a few minutes to visit yet most people have no idea what it is or why it is there.

To see other images and buy apparel or prints, please visit my commercial gallery.

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation

Anne Frankhuis Amsterdam

The only time I ever went to the Anne Frankhuis I only had a two megapixel digital camera with me. It was in 2002 and their weren’t too many cameras that higher resolution and since I didn’t have high speed film, the digital camera was the only choice. As I looked out of the window staring at the tree that she saw every day and wrote about, a group of school children were marching by on their way to school. It struck me in an instant that she witnessed this same scene every day as she was cut off from being a children. It still brings tears to my eyes. You can see other work from my European Gallery by clicking here.

Anne Fankhuis Amsterdam NL

http://www.annefrank.org